There’s nothing more rewarding than being part of someone else’s blessing.

I recently received an emotional call from a friend (we’ll call her Laura) who was witnessing a revelation. Like many of my friends these days, Laura’s between jobs and her money has lost its elasticity. She can’t seem to stretch it far enough to cover her expenses. In deference to that, several months ago her sister hosted a “wishing well” birthday party to provide some financial support. Friends were asked to contribute.

I was unable to attend, so I bought a birthday card and planned to insert a check. I was in the middle of a move and living in a temporary location. I couldn’t find my checkbook, so I set the card aside and obviously put something on top of it. After a while, out of sight was out of mind.

A couple of weeks ago, after I was settled into my new place, I ran across the bright orange and yellow card, but I had a different problem: Laura’s address wasn’t in my directory. I set the card on my not so uncluttered desk and lost sight of it again. A few days later, I spotted it. Determined to get it out of the apartment, I stopped what I was doing, wrote a check and tracked down her address; then I walked directly to the mailbox before any other goofiness ensued.

The next day, Laura left lengthy messages on my office and mobile phones. The excitement in her voice was a mixture of joy and tears. Here’s why:

She had a mortgage payment due in two days. That day, she was unexpectedly paid early for two small freelance projects and a friend had loaned her a little money; but when she returned home that evening, she was still $40 short of her mortgage. When she opened her mail, she discovered my $50 check. She was ecstatic!

Everything had come together in the most perfect way, at the most perfect time. If I had sent the check earlier, who knows, she might have already spent it on something else. My serial delays had served as an absent-minded savings account, belatedly delivering the money to Laura exactly when she needed it. Divine Order: I was almost as excited to witness it as she was.

Last week I heard from Laura again. This time, she was sending one of those lovely email chain letters. At least this one didn’t threaten that Jesus would deny me to his Father if I didn’t forward it. But it did urge me to make a wish and forward the email to a specified number of people (in this case, a dozen plus the sender). On a specified day (in this case, the fourth), the message claimed, something would happen.

Because I don’t believe that God or fairies bestow blessings based on the number of emails we shoot into Cyberspace, I did what I always do when I receive these messages: I asked Laura, “Did you ask the previous recipients what happened on their fourth day?” Then I heartlessly deleted it.

A couple of days ago, Laura sent me an update: “On the fifth day, I received an unexpected check for $800!” she exclaimed.

I’m not one to snub my nose at anyone’s cash windfall, but I wasn’t impressed. I was, however, a bit curious about the details of Laura’s $800 surprise. So I pried my fingers from the computer keyboard, picked up the phone and had a human-to-human conversation.

I discovered that the check was actually a refund of the same mortgage payment that Laura had made the week before—a payment that left her only a few dollars to survive.

“I had just decided to let go of this house instead of letting it stress me out,” Laura laughed. “As soon as I released it, this happened.”

What happened was that Laura received word that her mortgage company had gone out of business. As a result, they couldn’t accept any loan payments, and all monies were being returned until the new lender could service the accounts.

Did Laura receive the $800 because she had mentally “let go” of her home? As we know, sometimes when we “let go and let God,” situations don’t always improve, in human terms. Sometimes the possession, loved one or relationship literally goes away—temporarily or permanently.

On the physical level, we typically perceive this as “loss.” Sometimes we respond by sinking into despair or struggling to hold onto what we believe we lost. As we grow to trust God completely, however, we are better able to understand that everything in the physical world is constantly undergoing change. The life span of all physical things is finite. As we evolve into an “egoless” state of mind, as philosopher Eckhart Tolle calls it, we are able to accept all departures as Divine Will. Instead of anxiety, fear, anger or desperation, we feel peaceful because we know that if he, she or it went away, it was divinely ordered and the Divine only works for our Highest Good.

That certainly appears to be Laura’s attitude. She isn’t interpreting her $800 refund as a signal that she will keep her home. All she knows is that she can keep it right now. She also knows that the unexpected check did not result from her forwarding the nebulous email. It also didn’t arrive because she prayed a certain prayer, called a certain name or clicked her heels three times.

That money was destined to return to her that day because it was her soul’s desire. Maybe it wanted her body to have grocery money; I don’t know. I do know, however, that if the soul had not desired it, it would not be there.

The $800 didn’t solve Laura’s problems, long term. The mortgage bill will become due again soon. What’s important is that she continues to “let go” and faithfully awaits God’s direction, rather than tries to manipulate God to follow her directions.

“Letting go” is not a physical ploy disguised a spiritual tactic to get what we want. It is a divine way of allowing our hearts to agree with our souls. It takes great faith to stop praying for God to genuflect to our human will and start humbling ourselves to honor Divine Will. It takes great strength to still our thoughts and shut our mouths long enough to hear and observe the direction that the Divine is revealing to us.

Many of us believe that we can change the conditions in our physical lives solely by changing the thoughts that run through our physical brains, by saying a prescribed word or phrase, or by changing our actions. Our life experiences have taught us that it really doesn’t work that way. If our bodies, brains and emotions were in charge, we’d all be independently wealthy, staring adoringly into our soulmates’ eyes and in tip-top physical shape—effortlessly, of course.

We spend a lot of time doing instead of being. We think that we have to “make things happen.” We think we are alone, that no one is looking out for our best interest. But we’re not alone. We’re in a serious, committed relationship. Our souls are married to our bodies—until physical death do we part.

Like all marriages, the peacefulness of the home requires harmonious communication between the partners. What happens when one partner makes important decisions without consulting the other? Chaos, tension and unhappiness–the same results you get whenever your heart and soul do not agree.

At prayer time, do you beg or bond with your partner? Do the desires of your heart conflict or collaborate with the desires of your soul? How do you know? When do you plan to find out? Whenever you do, you will start to experience real change, accelerated growth and consistently answered prayers.

——————–

Love it LIVE—An Upcoming Event in Chicago!

If you missed the three-day Women’s Conference in June, I have good news: By popular demand, authors Shirley Lawson, Stephanie Wilson-Coleman and I will conduct sessions at “The Women’s Conference Follow-Up” on Saturday, September 19. This time, it’s in Chicago, at Power Circle Center, 9350-64 S. South Chicago Avenue.

This special event is presented by the Training, Development and Networking Team of the Alpha Omega Sisterhood, a ministry of the Power Circle Congregation, the Rev. Joseph E. Hill, founder and senior minister.

For more information and to register for only $40, visit Drama Queen Workshops.

Tagged with →  
Share →

6 Responses to Answered Prayer: When Heart and Soul Agree

  1. Bobby says:

    Nice piece. A women’s follow up is nice also. Nice is my favorite word.

  2. Laura says:

    Hi Pat:

    It’s Laura again. Where do I start? Last week my toner ran out on my printer (I have one of those three-in-one things: fax, copier, printer). Since it runs out at least once a month, and the toner is $81.00, I decided that I need a new printer. So, the day I got the letter from Western Union saying my $800 had been rejected, by the time I got to the Currency Exchange it was closed – still, I went to Staples to see what kind of cheap laser printer I could buy. They had a color laser for $299 which is cheap but still out of my price range. Sunday, I got my refund and headed up to Staples to get a toner, and to see if I could put the color laser printer in layaway – but because I had received one phone call after the other I got to Staples 5 minutes after they closed. So I went to Best Buy down the street. They didn’t have the toner, but they had the exact same $299 color laser printer for $149.00!!

    • loudmouthinthebalcony says:

      Laura: Keep observing the guidance you’re given and the doors that close. Be habitually watchful and trust in the guidance you’re given. It’s called “going with the flow.” Sometimes, it even leads you to a bargain. You go, Girl!

  3. Denrique says:

    Just this weekend I heard a sermon. The pastor said, “God does not move in mysterious ways. He moves in perfect time.” His words are very indicative of what you’re describing.

    I am a firm believe that things happen for reasons. Even the worst of things are blessings in disguise. I believe that God has “his” plan, so, things we hope and wish for may never happen, because they are not “his” plans.

    However, I do believe that God rewards hard work. I’d rather spend my day working toward a goal than reading hundreds of chain letters with those ridiculous forwarding requirements. My faith is in God, not chain letters. I tell folks don’t bother to send them to me. I just delete them.

    The chronology of my life since I’ve lived in the U.S.A is remarkable in itself. God had blessed me all in “his” time and I’ve remain true to my personal motto. “I never worry about tomorrow. I’d rather prepare myself for it.”

    I really enjoy this! I will forward this to my friends.

  4. Michael says:

    I just listened to a CD the other day by Guy Finley on this very subject. The perceived walls we come up against in life are reflections of what we ourselves have invited to allow us to see what we are indeed wanting to move beyond. How they are the very condition that allows us to see what we are attached to, or cling to from a previous wanting often, or perhaps usually, based on the ego’s idea of what is best. Letting go of one’s idea, and will, of what is best, or wanted, and moving into the territory of “fresh perception” can feel vulnerable. We are creatures of habit and conditioning. Which is probably why an organic rendering of “thy will be done” has such power to it.

    And I must admit, it is that mental and psychic act of “letting go”, the willingness to do so, that more often than I care to admit, binds me to any experience of dissatisfaction. Learning to let go, to trust, to listen, to receive, to take inspired action, to continue to turst. Moment by moment. A key lesson in the ongoing process of surrendering to the divine.

  5. loudmouthinthebalcony says:

    Ah, yes–learning to trust God is the hard part when the ego tells us, “If it is to be, it’s up to me.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *